It’s been a long year for everyone, and it’s only halfway through.

Covid 19 seems to have turned most people’s world around — certainly in the cities. We’ve learned that the disease is transmitted by the air — it’s in the wind, so to speak. It’s everywhere around the world, quick as a flash.

While country folk missed out on the brunt of the pandemic, rural Australia has had to deal directly with other issues.

Here in the land down under, Covid come hot on the heels of the worst bushfires we’ve had in many years. These bushfires were the…


I live with a couple of fur babies — a dog and a cat. We speak three different languages; which are, of course, ‘dog’, ‘cat’ and ‘human’. How much ‘human’ either creature speaks is open to interpretation — but each has an understanding of certain words or gestures made by the human. I have limited ‘dog’ and ‘cat’ in my vocabulary, but I have enough to get me by. The dog won’t learn cat; cats are never to be trusted, you see. …


Photo by Jenna Norman on Unsplash

So many contradictions exist in the observed world right now. To the uninitiated, it may seem a little overwhelming.

It starts at birth.

In the womb, babies see the world through soft light, filtered through mother’s body. Blurry pinks in the safe place inside her.

The moment those eyes open to the outside world, everything is different.

Right from the get go, baby is bombarded with so much light it is blinded. Most Western babies are born in a hospital which is lit so intensely that even shadows have nowhere to go. …


You will do as I instruct.

I got out of bed, disrupting forever the cat’s sangfroid. This circumstance isn’t particularly distressing — the cat was comfortably cradled beside me, receiving his morning cuddle as per every other morning for the past few years. Then, when I decide to face the day, the cat shows his displeasure at losing the stored heat of a human body. I don’t allow him to sleep all night in the bed, just a quick cuddle in the early morning pre dawn light. It’s the trade off I allow him for my refusing his frequent and unrelenting attempts to climb into bed…


Lets jump back in time by twenty years or so — to 1999. Australia is in full neo liberal mode, with an Olympics about to take place just down the road in Sydney. The food business is booming — indeed, most businesses are booming. The mining industry is making obscene profits, and the stockmarket has not yet crashed. No one thinks it ever will.

Restaurants and retailers were popping up with large amounts of capital behind them, as investors looked to put their (obscene) windfalls into effective businesses which would minimise their tax for a good few years. Some of…


The west had entered my veins. I was a long way from the Hunter Valley. Yet I felt at home. I understand now why Western Australians have a different presence, a kind of WA attitude. They understand how damn big this country is, because they experience it more often than maybe us East Coast folk do.

I decided to head back to Perth for a few more days. I had a bit more free time before I was due to embark on the return Nullabor crossing, on my way to Mildura, and then on to the central west of NSW…


The Nullabor, twisted by me, in a camera.

The final workshop for the Esperance leg of the trip was held at Yirri Grove Olive plantation, out on the other side of good old Esperance.

I love the twist and turns of this journey; how they continue to surprise me. Plain sailing was never the objective of this trip. Nor was it expected, with an eighteen year old car and a recycled bakery shop being towed about fourteen thousand kilometers while crossing the seventh largest continent on earth. …


So it was off to Esperance. I’d been averaging a workshop every couple of weeks so far. Suddenly I was flat out. In Esperance I had a busy itinerary, with two Bush Baking workshops and a demonstration bake to do; all in the space of about a week. In addition, I had to cast an eye over BreadLocal’s home based microbakery.

BreadLocal is the brainchild of Tiff Brown, who came to study with me some years back. She has continued her study of bread and pastry production processes in multiple countries over the whole time, and now creates sourdough loaves…


Those hand made doughs, with the breath of the Antarctic in them, found their way to Knoxfield, a ‘light industrial’ suburb in Melbourne’s sprawling urban network. There, I found Southern Biological, the warehouse site of my next Bush Baking workshop.

Heather, an owner of the business, contacted me some time back when I was planning this journey. She had previously made the trip to the Hunter Valley to attend one of my Sourdough 101 workshops. …


The daily routine on the road has kept me away from the keys this past few weeks. And before that, well, I was building the trailer. Not to mention putting the bakery and household into storage for a while whilst I go on this mad adventure. Time, it seems, has been spent on these things, rather than ‘telling the story’ of these things.

Now I’m settling into life as a traveler, the time to write has become a bit more possible, so here’s an update. …

Warwick Quinton

Teller of tall tales, observer of the slow unravel. Long time SourdoughBaker, and an advocate of simple, slow and small.

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